Avoiding The Sink

As we’ve talked a lot about public health this week, I figured I would expand on a practice that greatly affects the general public, which is washing our hands.  We’ve been taught ever since we can remember to wash our hands after using the bathroom and before each meal.  There are signs in every restaurant and fast food chain nationwide that require employees to do so before when exiting a bathroom.  We all know that washing our hands is extremely essential to prevent the spread of bacteria and any kind of sickness.  What we fail to touch on as a society is the fact that many of us refuse or simply forget to to reach our hands under the fosset before we eat or after we use the bathroom.  I think we can all recall watching someone walk directly from the bathroom stall to the door without any hesitation, and maybe you were looking in the mirror as you walked out.

Many doctors and health experts agree that washing your hands is the best way to prevent the spread of germs and illnesses, and calls for daily application unlike flu shots and vaccines.  If this practice is so essential why do some people refuse to participate so often? Do they not realize that they are putting themselves and the general public at risk?

Some people simply believe that it is not worth it.  They understand the amount of germs located on every counter top and architectural aspect of a public bathroom, and simply think that drying their hands and touching the door handle will result in the reverse affects of washing their hands initially.  This is a valid argument, although there are precautions that can be taken to overcome these worries, such as grabbing the door handle with your sleeve or a paper towel as you exit the bathroom.  In conclusion, research overshadows superstition, as it has been proven that washing your hands does indeed keep your from physically in taking the bacteria you’ve contracted on your hands over the day.  Washing your hands after you’ve shaken hands with someone, traced your hand down a railing or even typed a text message on your own phone are all good ways to promote public health and reduce the risk of illness.

-Jack Pakozdi

Source: http://www.slate.com/articles/news_and_politics/recycled/2009/04/handwashing_in_public_bathrooms.html

Advertisements

2 thoughts on “Avoiding The Sink

  1. Aside from enough food and clean water I agree that washing your hands is the best way to protect yourself from many diseases. In France most folks greet friends with a cheek to cheek kiss instead of a hand shake and eat with a knife and fork, never touching their food. French folks have a longer life expectancy than Americans and at least on my visits seem to get sick less often than Americans.

    I believe that healthy people build immunity by getting exposed to germs and allowing their bodies natural defense mechanisms to attack and overcome the germs. Somewhere I read that you should get two to three colds per year. If you get less you are not getting exposed to enough germs, if you get more then you need to improve your personal hygiene.

    Where does the balance lie? Should we wash everything with bleach? or maybe allow ourselves to get sick a few times a year and take a day or two off work and school?

    Mike Cappel

    Like

  2. I like this post and I definitely agree with you. I was my hands constantly throughout the day. before and after I eat or use the bathroom, before I touch my face, and constantly at work because I work with food. People that neglect washing their hands don’t realize how many germs they possess. People need to be much better about washing their hands for their own personal health!
    Thanks for sharing!
    -Kellie Behrle

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s