Cheating Ourselves of Sleep

Think you do just fine on five or six hours of shut-eye? Chances are, you are among the many millions who unwittingly shortchange themselves on sleep.

Research shows that most people require seven or eight hours of sleep to function optimally. Failing to get enough sleep night after night can compromise your health and may even shorten your life. From infancy to old age, the effects of inadequate sleep can profoundly affect memory, learning, creativity, productivity and emotional stability, as well as your physical health.

A number of bodily systems are negatively affected by inadequate sleep: the heart, lungs and kidneys; appetite, metabolism and weight control; immune function and disease resistance; sensitivity to pain; reaction time; mood; and brain function. Poor sleep is also a risk factor for depression and substance abuse, especially among people with post-traumatic stress disorder. People with PTSD tend to relive their trauma when they try to sleep, which keeps their brains in a heightened state of alertness.

Several studies have linked insufficient sleep to weight gain. Not only do night owls with shortchanged sleep have more time to eat, drink and snack, but levels of the hormone leptin, which tells the brain enough food has been consumed, are lower in the sleep-deprived while levels of ghrelin, which stimulates appetite, are higher. In addition, metabolism slows when one’s circadian rhythm and sleep are disrupted; if not counteracted by increased exercise or reduced caloric intake, this slowdown could add up to 10 extra pounds in a year.

Children can also experience hormonal disruptions from inadequate sleep. Growth hormone is released during deep sleep; it not only stimulates growth in children, but also boosts muscle mass and repairs damaged cells and tissues in both children and adults. With insufficient sleep, thinking slows, it is harder to focus and pay attention, and people are more likely to make poor decisions and take undue risks. As you might guess, these effects can be disastrous when operating a motor vehicle or dangerous machine.

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2 thoughts on “Cheating Ourselves of Sleep

  1. I really find studies over sleep interesting! I think our society has made sleep seem less of a necessity to our health and more like something you earn if you get all your work done, get the kids in bed early, etc. It is also common to see the belief that people who don’t get a lot of sleep because of school or work are working hard, becoming successful, and accomplishing a lot. To me losing sleep over constant stresses in my life is not worth it the health issues it inflicts.

    – Mattie Martin

    Like

  2. Hi Jack,
    Good post. To enhance further posts use a visual appeal that really bring the readers in. This can be trough adding links along with your picture. Your picture brings visual elements but could go even deeper.
    ~Lauren

    Like

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